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Scotland

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Things to do and See in Scotland

Edinburgh


Edinburgh is Scotland's capital and is one of the most beautiful cities in the world and it has been inhabited since around 1500 BC.  Edinburgh is a medieval city with cobblestone streets and buildings dating back to the 11th century and everything is set around the historical Edinburgh Castle that sits atop a dormant volcano.  If you love history Edinburgh is a perfect city to experience it, with every building along the Royal Mile having a different story to be told about it. Edinburgh has sixteen thousand buildings that are listed as architecturally or historical important, in a city that is a World Heritage Site.

Today, Edinburgh is a huge university town and one of the most visited destinations in Britain if not Europe. If you require more information go to the Edinburgh's Tourist Information Centre is at 3 Princess Street, which is located above the Waverley Train Station or go to www.edinburgh.org

The Edinburgh Pass is an excellent card to get as it gives you free entry to over 30 top attractions, city centre and airport bus transport and loads more for only £20, so its highly recommended if you come to the city.

 


Edinburgh Castle


Edinburgh Castle dominates the city center, sitting on top of an extinct volcano. This is Scotland's most visited attraction. The castle is magnificent from every angle, but perhaps the best view is from Princess Street Gardens. The oldest building in the castle is St. Margaret's Chapel, which dates back to the 11th Century. The Scottish Crown Jewels and the Stone of Destiny are kept within the castle. There are many other things to observe in the castle, but a favorite of mine is the Scottish National War Memorial, which commemorates the soldiers that fought in various wars throughout history for the Commonwealth. If you go to Edinburgh we definitely recommend you do a tour around the castle. Admission is £9, but subject to change. For more information go to www.edinburghcastle.biz or www.historic-scotland.gov.uk

 

 

Walk Along the Royal Mile

This cobbled stone mile is the most attractive street in Edinburgh's old town. On one end of the mile you have Edinburgh Castle and on the other end you have Holyrood Palace and the future home of the Scottish Parliament. Along this mile you will also see St. Giles Cathedral, regarded as the mother church of Presbyterianism, which was constructed in 1243. This street is packed with cafes, restaurants, tourist shops, hostels, and it wouldn't be Scotland without all the pubs. If you aren't in a rush to walk down the Royal Mile and do a pub crawl, which that should take a few hours.

 

 

Mac Tours

This Hop-on-Hop-off tour company is arguably Edinburgh’s best as it shows you the many places of interest around the city. Tickets are for 24 hours, so if you didn’t see everything you wanted in the first day, jump on again. For more information on Mac Tours go to www.edinburghtour.com

 

 

Arthur’s Seat

Located in Holyrood Park this dormant volcano has not erupted for millions of years. This is Edinburgh's highest point and boasts of having stunning views of the Firth of Forth and the Pentland Hills. It will take at least an hour to climb up to this windy summit. I recommend make a day out of it and bring a picnic along.

 

 

Calton Hill

Calton Hill is easily accessible from the east end of Princes Street. During my time in Edinburgh this was one of my favorite places to relax and enjoy the scenery. From the one side of Calton Hill you get an amazing view of Edinburgh Castle, as well as views of Arthur's Seat and the Royal Mile. Calton Hill also houses the Nelson Monument and an observatory. In summer Calton Hill is the location of an annual Pagan Festival, which brings out all sorts of people for a night of alternative celebration.

 

 

Edinburgh Military Tattoo

The Edinburgh Military Tattoo has been acclaimed by many as the greatest show on earth. The Tattoo is a dazzling and compelling celebration of music, dance, and drama. The Edinburgh Military Tattoo encompasses many military bands and parades and is held six days a week, during the Edinburgh Festival, in the Castle Esplanade. The Castle is a perfect backdrop for this brilliant show. Every year more than 100 million people around the world watch the Tattoo on TV and more than 11 million people from over 100 countries have experienced the Tattoo live at Edinburgh Castle. If you require more information on the Edinburgh Military Tattoo their official website is: www.edintattoo.co.uk.

 


Hogmanay

Edinburgh's Hogmanay is renowned around the world as a huge snogfest. This annual New Year's event attracts more than 200,000 people to the city centre. What started off as a little bash on the Royal Mile has now spread to Princess Street and North Bridge. Because of its popularity and size this is now a ticket event. Unless you are living or staying in the area, if you don't have a ticket, you will not be getting in. I was at the Millennium Hogmanay which ended up being the third biggest party in the world for New Years. When the bells strike twelve the snogathon, begins with strangers kissing strangers all night.

 

 

Ghost Tours

A number of companies offer ghost tours around Edinburgh. This city is believed to have a haunted history, with most of the tours taking you through the Underground City.  Most of the tours start on the Royal Mile. The one we recommend is Mary King’s Close and their website is www.realmarykingsclose.com

 

 

Royal Botanic Gardens

Founded in 1670, the Royal Botanic Gardens is recognized as on of the best in the world.  Amongst its 70 acres of stunning scenery, and breathtaking landscape, it’s a place you definitely don’t want to miss. For more information on the Royal Botanic Gardens go to www.rbge.org.uk

 

 

Holyrood Palace

The Palace of Holyroodhouse, which is the official residence in Scotland of the Queen, is located at the end of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh. With Arthur’s Seat as its back drop it’s an area of Edinburgh you don’t want to miss. Admission is £8, but subject to change. For more information on the Holyrood Palace go to www.royal.gov.uk

 

 

The Meadows

Located in the city centre of Edinburgh, the Meadows is a very popular spot for locals in summer, as loads of  people go there to relax or kick the ball around.

 

 

Princess Street Gardens

The Princess Street Gardens were built in the hollow of a drained loch; the gardens sit opposite Edinburgh’s main shopping street and beneath the castle. On a warm summers day this is the place you will see thousands of Scots sitting on the grass and soaking up the sun.

 

 

Dynamic Earth

The Dynamic Earth is a place that shouldn’t be missed, as it shows and tells you of the past and present of things that have happened on earth and how it was created. Admission is £9, but subject to change. For more information on the Dynamic Earth go to www.dynamicearth.co.uk

 


Museum of Scotland

The Museum of Scotland was opened in December 1998, in a spectacular new building. The exhibits detail the country’s history from its geological formation and earliest inhabitants up to the 20th century. Exhibits include a traveling canteen belonging to Bonnie Prince Charlie and articles from Robert the Bruce and William Wallace. Admission is free and for more information on the Museum of Scotland go to www.nms.ac.uk 

 


St Giles Cathedral

Located on the Royal Mile, the St Giles Cathedral was built in the 12th century. History says the historical John Knox was the first Protestant minister at the Cathedral during the reformation and its renowned for its stained glass.

Today, visitors have the opportunity to go inside the Cathedral and take a picture of some amazing architecture. For more information on St Giles Cathedral go to www.stgilescathedral.org.uk

 

 

Scotch Whisky Heritage Centre

For all those who love whisky this is the place for you. Located on the Royal Mile you have a chance here to sample a dram of whisky and learn about some of the history and what makes it Scotland’s drink. Admission is £8, but prices are subject to change. For more information the Scotch Whisky Heritage Centre go to www.whisky-heritage.co.uk 

 

 

Scottish National Portrait Gallery

This gallery is located on Queen Street in Edinburgh and it has pieces from the 16th century to the present time.

 

 

National Gallery of Scotland

Located on the Mound in Edinburgh and if you are into art then this is arguably the best in Edinburgh as its your chance to see fine art from the early Renaissance to the end of the 19th Century. It's a must for any art lover

 

 

National War Museum

This museum is located within the walls of Edinburgh Castle and its your chance to discover the war and military serive of the servicemen of Scotland through history. Admission is included in the price of admission for entrance to the castle

 

 

Gallery of Modern Art & The Dean Company

This gallery is set in parkland landscaped dramatically these two galleries house many important works from the 1900s to the present day and is a must if you are visiting Edinburgh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glasgow

 
Located only an hour west of the capital, Glasgow is Scotland’s true Scottish city. If you go to Edinburgh you are bound to run into travelers, politicians or students as its Scotland’s international city. If you come to Glasgow you will have the chance to meet the true Scots who I’m sure will tell you a story or two. Also, as Edinburgh is considered the home of rugby in the country, Glasgow is considered the home for football, as all the international games are played at Hampden Park in the city.
 
Glasgow which was once an important shipbuilding centre and well known for massive engineering works, where the locomotives of the nation were produced, fell into decline and it’s only been in the past ten years that it has seen regeneration in the city. Today, it’s a great city for shopping or a night out as it has some of the best clubs in the United Kingdom. For more information on Glasgow go to www.seeglasgow.com

 

Celtic Park (Parkhead)

Celtic Park was built in 1892 and it holds over 60,000 people. This is also the home to Celtic Football Club, who is one of the best clubs in the country and who is constantly playing in Europe. If you are in the city go to a game as Celtic fans are one of the best in Europe and you have an amazing time. For more information on Celtic Football Club go to www.celticfc.net

 

 

Hampden Park

This stadium is steeped in Scottish Football history.  Do a tour of the grounds and see more than 2500 exhibits in 14 galleries.  Also, see the legends of Scottish football in the Hall of Fame.  This is a tour we recommend and if you would like more information on Hampden Park go to www.scottishfootballmuseum.org.uk

 


Glasgow Science Centre

The Glasgow Science Centre houses the Science Mall, with hundreds of hands-on exhibits covering the spectrum of natural and applied sciences, from astronomy to bionics. The exhibitions range across three floors and are divided by theme ‘exploration and discovery’, ‘science in action’ and ‘science and you’. A tunnel leads to the base of the 127m-high (417ft) Glasgow Tower, poised like a pencil standing on its tip. It is the only tower in the world that rotates to face the oncoming wind and although it offers great views of the city. Another attraction is the newly developed £75 million project IMAX Theatre. Admission is £7, but prices are subject to change. For more information on the Glasgow Science Centre go to www.gsc.org.uk

 

 

The Centre For Contemporary Arts

The Centre for Contemporary Arts provides a platform for exciting and inspiring cutting edge contemporary visual art, performance, film, music, spoken word and other events. Centre for Contemporary Arts is a hub of experimental creative activity that engages with individuals and communities, contributing to the vibrancy and vitality of cultural life in Glasgow and beyond.

Centre for Contemporary Arts curates six major exhibitions a year, showing a wide range of Scottish and international contemporary art, as well as being home to Intermedia Gallery for emerging artists. Fast developing a reputation for world class improvised, experimental and electronic music, Centre for Contemporary Arts also screens independent short, foreign and documentary films rarely presented in Scotland, through film strands Beta Movement and Dark Visions. On top the Centre has an Arthouse cinema and a hip and trendy bar. Entrance to Centre for Contemporary Arts exhibitions and many events is free.

 

 

The Charles Rennie Mackintosh-Designed Glasgow School of Art

The Charles Rennie Mackintosh-Designed Glasgow School of Art is an architectural masterpiece and a vibrant art school. Visitors can enjoy student-led guided tours to goggle at the furniture, artwork and interiors.

It's open seven days a week from April to September and tickets cost £8.75. but please keep in mind these prices can change at any time. This is a strange attraction, but worth a look.

 

 

The Burrell Collection

The Burrell Collection is a free art gallery that is set in the tranquil Pollok Country Park. The eclectic collection was acquired over many years by Sir William Burrell who was a wealthy Glaswegian shipping magnate and art collector. He then gifted it to the city of Glasgow Corporation in 1944.  The gift was made on the condition that the collection was to be housed in a building 16 miles (26 km) from the centre of Glasgow, to show the works to their greatest advantage, and to avoid the damaging effects of air pollution at the time. The trustees spent over 20 years trying to find a suitable 'home' for the collection, one which met all the criteria set out in the Trust Deed, without success. Eventually, the Pollok Country Park was gifted to the city in 1967, the Trustees had certain terms of the deed waived, which allowed the current site, 3 miles (5 km) from the city centre and within the city boundaries, to be chosen for the collection. Some of the displays include artists such as Degas and Cezanne.

 

 

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

This is one of Scotland's most visited attraction. Inside this magnificent building there are 22 themed, state-of-the-art galleries that house an astonishing 8,000 objects and artifacts.

The collections are extensive and wide-ranging that cover natural history, art, arms and armour and loads more. If you plan to visit Glasgow make sure you put this in your must things to do.

 

 

 

 

 

Inverness

Inverness has a population of over 70,000 and its considered to be the capital of the Highlands of Scotland. The word Inverness in Gaelic means 'mouth of the River Ness'.

The city lies near two important battle sites: the 11th century battle of Blar nam Feinne against Norway which took place on the Aird and the 18th century Battle of Culloden which took place on Culloden Moor against the English. It was after this battle when the English banned the kilts and bag pipes and sometimes also referred to the Highland clearances. From here many of the Scots were sent to either Australia or Canada.

Inverness is the northermost city in the United Kingdom and lies within the Great Glen (Gleann Mòr) at its north-eastern extremity where the River Ness enters the Moray Firth. At the latest, a settlement was established by the 6th century with the first royal charter being granted by Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim (King David I) in the 12th century. The Gaelic king, Mac Bethad mac Findláich (MacBeth) nicknamed An Rígh Dearg (The Red King) held a castle within the city where he ruled as Mormaer of Moray and Ross. Today, in recent years the city has seen a growth in population and every year the tourists flock here in summer for all its tourist attractions.

 

Inverness Castle

There has been a castle on this site where the Inverness Castle stands since the 12th Century. Prince Charles Edward Stuart's Jacobites blew up the Hanoverian Fort in 1746. The present sandstone building dates back from 1834 with the North block added in 1847. Today it serves as the Inverness Sheriff Court House.

 

 

Culloden Battlefield

This battlefield is located 8km east of Inverness. This was the site of one of Scotland's most famous battles. This battle, fought between England and Bonnie Prince Charlie’s forces in 1746, the battle only lasted just over an hour before the highlanders lost.

When the battle ended the highland clearances began. This was when the highlanders were cleared off their land and it was deemed illegal to wear the tartan, play the bag pipes, or speak Gaelic. Many of these people moved to Nova Scotia in Canada and the South Island of New Zealand.

 

 

Abertarff House

This building was built in 1593 and is the earliest surviving house in Inverness. The crow-stepped gables are known as "corbie steps" and this house stands out on its crowded street. It was restored in 1966 by The National Trust of Scotland after being received from the National Commercial Bank.

 

 

Old High Church

The original Parish Church of Inverness dedicated to St Mary, built on St Michael's Mount since at least the 12th Century. The base of the bell tower probably dates from the 15th century and the top from the 17th. The church was built in the 1770's and it housed Jacobite prisoners after the Battle of Culloden. Some of these prisoners were also exectued in the graveyard.

 

 

The Caledonian Canal

Considered by many to be one of the greatest waterways of the world and is a true masterpiece of canal engineering. It slices through the length of the Great Glen, which is a massive geological fault in the Earth's crust.

The Caledonian Canal runs 62 miles (100 km) in a straight line from Innverness to Corpach near Fort William. One third is man-made, the rest being formed by four lochs including Loch Ness. An Act of Parliament in July 1803 authorising the canal engineer Thomas Telford to survey, design and build the waterway. Opening in 1822, at a cost £910,000 employing over 3,000 people. There are 29 locks, 4 aqueducts and 10 bridges.

The canal is now a Scheduled Ancient Monument, attracting over half a million visitors each year. There are many ways to enjoy the Caledonian Canal, walking or cycling along the tow-paths, or cruising on Hotel Barges.

 

 

Cawdor Castle

Located just east of Inverness, the magnificet stronghold of Cawdor Castle is an extremely popular visitor attraction.

The story of Cawdor Castle is conected with William, 3rd Thane of Cawdor, who decided to build the castle. In 1370 he had a dream, which told him to load panniers of gold on the back of a donkey, and follow until it lay down, whichi it did next to a tree.

Cawdor Castle is built around the hawthorn tree the donkey rested at, hense "The Hawthorn Room" in today's castle. Legend has it that the tree has magical qualities which have saved the castle on more than one occasion.

The castle also has a gift shop, a bookshop, a wool shop; an excellent restaurant in the castle itself. There is a snack bar near the car park. Visitors can wander at will through the walled garden, flower garden and wild garden. There is also a picnic area, a 9-hole pitch and a putt golf course, a duck pond, and an extensive area of natural woodland with a series of way-marked natural trails with different lengths from three quarters of a mile up to five miles.

 

 

Scottish Islands

 

The Orkneys

Orkneys are an island located just off the country’s north coast. The main city is Kirkwall and it has many interesting pre-historic sites, including the Stone Age village of Skara Brae, the Maes Howe burial mound, and the standing stones at the Ring of Brogar. The Vikings discovered this island a 1000 years ago and you can they were here every where you look. 

If you want to take the ferry across to the Orkneys from the mainland, there are is a ferry from John O'Groats that leave daily between May to September. The ferry arrives into Burwick, which is on the Orkneys. For more information on the Orkneys go to www.visitorkney.com

 

 

Isle of Skye

This is one of the country’s most visited islands and it’s just off the western coast of the country separated by ferry links from Mallaig, while the Skye Bridge crosses from Kyle of Lochalsh. On the island you will see loads of history where the MacDonald Clan once ruled over the island. It’s defiantly worth a visit as we guarantee you won’t be disappointed. For more information on Skye go to www.visitscotland.com

 

 

Islay

It may be most famous as being home to eight whisky distilleries (producing some of the world’s most famous whisky brands), but another tourist attraction is that its home to the world’s first commercial wave power station. For more information on Islay go to www.islayinfo.com

 

 

 

Scottish Castles

 

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle dominates the city center, sitting on top of an extinct volcano. This is Scotland's most visited attraction. The castle is magnificent from every angle, but perhaps the best view is from Princess Street Gardens. The oldest building in the castle is St. Margaret's Chapel, which dates back to the 11th Century. The Scottish Crown Jewels and the Stone of Destiny are kept within the castle. There are many other things to observe in the castle, but a favorite of mine is the Scottish National War Memorial, which commemorates the soldiers that fought in various wars throughout history for the Commonwealth. If you go to Edinburgh we definitely recommend you do a tour around the castle. Admission is £9, but subject to change. For more information go to www.edinburghcastle.biz or www.historic-scotland.gov.uk

 

 

Inverness Castle

There has been a castle on this site where the Inverness Castle stands since the 12th Century. Prince Charles Edward Stuart's Jacobites blew up the Hanoverian Fort in 1746. The present sandstone building dates back from 1834 with the North block added in 1847. Today it serves as the Inverness Sheriff Court House.

 

 

Cawdor Castle

Located just east of Inverness, the magnificet stronghold of Cawdor Castle is an extremely popular visitor attraction.

The story of Cawdor Castle is conected with William, 3rd Thane of Cawdor, who decided to build the castle. In 1370 he had a dream, which told him to load panniers of gold on the back of a donkey, and follow until it lay down, whichi it did next to a tree.

Cawdor Castle is built around the hawthorn tree the donkey rested at, hense "The Hawthorn Room" in today's castle. Legend has it that the tree has magical qualities which have saved the castle on more than one occasion.

The castle also has a gift shop, a bookshop, a wool shop; an excellent restaurant in the castle itself. There is a snack bar near the car park. Visitors can wander at will through the walled garden, flower garden and wild garden. There is also a picnic area, a 9-hole pitch and a putt golf course, a duck pond, and an extensive area of natural woodland with a series of way-marked natural trails with different lengths from three quarters of a mile up to five miles.

 

 

Urquhart Castle

The magnificent Urquhart Castle is situated on the banks of Loch Ness and it is considered to be the jewel of Loch Ness. Today, it still remains an impressive stronghold despite its ruinous state. It was once one of Scotland’s largest castles, Urquhart’s remains include a tower house that commands splendid views of the famous loch and Great Glen.

Urquhart Castle has a place of dark deeds and high drama and has been at the sharp end of history. Its witnessed considerable conflict throughout its 500 years as a medieval fortress as its been harassed, seized, plundered and robbed many times by everyone from English invaders to the Lord of the Isles.

Its history from the 13th to 17th centuries was particularly bloody. Following Edward I’s invasion, it fell into English hands and was then reclaimed and lost again. In the 14th century, it figured prominently in the Scots’ struggle for independence and came under the control of Robert the Bruce after he became King of Scots.

In the 15th and 16th centuries, the castle and glen were frequently raided from the west by the ambitious MacDonald Lords of the Isles.

The castle’s history and that of the noble families – Durward, MacDonald and Grant – who held it, is told in the exhibition and audio-visual display in the new visitor centre. The Centre features an outstanding array of medieval artefacts found at the castle.

Today, visitors can relax in the café and visit the shop with its local crafts. The visitor centre contains retail, interpretation area, audio-visual presentation and tearoom and toilets on one level. Stunning views of the loch can be obtained from visitor centre veranda. For more information on admission prices and times that Urquhart Castle is opened go to www.historic-scotland.gov.uk


 

 

Eilean Donan Castle

Located along the west coast near Kyle of Lochalsh, it's the most photographed castle in the world. It was originally built in 1220 to keep the Vikings out an later the English and other invaders from the Isles. Today it costs £3 to take a tour of the castle, but these prices can change.

 

 

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle, like Edinburgh Castle, stands proudly on top of a volcanic hill creating the city's skyline. Most of Scotland's famous battles have taken place here at Stirling Castle. Just outside the castle one of the most famous battles took place at Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn, where William ‘Braveheart’ Wallace and Robert Bruce respectively inflicted humiliating defeats on the English in the late-13th and early-14th centuries. This was the one of the battles that was on the movie ‘Braveheart’. Stirling Castle is a gateway to the highlands and it has always been a strategic position for either the English or Scottish. Today the William Wallace Monument stands next to this castle. If you are in Stirling I definitely recommend doing a tour of this amazing castle. For more information on Stirling Castle go to www.historic-scotland.gov.uk

 

 

Blair Castle and Gardens

Blair Castle and Gardens is nestled in the dramatic Highland Perthshire landscape and Blair Castle has over 700 years of history and since opening its doors to the public in 1936, it has seen tens of thousands see its proud history. 

The Castle is famous as the last castle to be held under siege in 1746, Blair Castle is the ancient seat of the Dukes and Earls of Atholl and the home of the Atholl Highlanders, Europe's only remaining private army. There are over 30 rooms on display, which are full of treasures and alive with characters and personalities of their former occupants.

Some of the highlights of the Castle include; the magnificent ballroom bedecked with 175 pairs of antlers: the suberb china room featuring more than 1700 individual pieces and an ornamental armoury housing a targe used at the Battle of Culloden. There are also paintings by Sir Edwin Landseer and Johann Zoffany, fine Mortlake tapestries and plasterwork by Thomas Clayton. Whatever your interest you are sure to be fasinated by Blair Castle and Gardens. For more information on Blair Castle and Gardens go to www.blair-castle.co.uk

 

 

Dunrobin Castle and Gardens

Dunrobin Castle and Gardens is located north of Inverness in Scotland's Highlands, it's one of the most northerly castle and largest with 189 rooms. It's also Britain's oldest continuously inhabited castles and it dates back to the early 1300s.

The beautiful Gardens were laid out in 1850 by the architect Sir Charles Barry, who was responsibe for the Victorian extension to the Castle and who designed the Houses of Parliment. The arrangement of the Gardens, inspired by those at Versailles, have changed little in the 150 years since they were planted. Despite its location so far north in Scotland, the sheltered Gardens are able to support a surprising range of plants. For more information on Dunrobin Castle and Gardens go to www.dunrobincastle.co.uk

 

 

The Castle & Gardens of Mey

This is the most northerly castle on the UK mainland and it stands in a magnificent setting on the Caithness coast, with amazing views across the Pentland Firth towards the Orkney Islands.

The Castle of Mey was built in the late 16th century by George Sinclair, who was the 4th Earl of Caithness and was occupied by his descendants for over 300 hundred years.

The 15th Earl of Caithness was the last Sinclair to live at Mey. When he died in 1889 the castle was bequeathed away from the Sinclair family and subsequently bought by The Queen Mother in 1952. When The Queen Mother first saw the Castle of Mey, it was in a poor state of repair. She loved the place and area and she used this as her holiday home to escape from the public eye. She used it till the day she past away and it has been left the way she left it when she past away.

As a visitor you will have a great insight and see how The Queen Mother lived. Also, the walled garden was dear to The Queen Mothers heart and it has been preserved the way she wanted it to be. The Gardens are beautiful and shouldn't be missed if you plan to visit.

The Queen Mother established The Queen Elizabeth Castle of Mey Trust in 1996 and transferred ownership of the castle to it a year later. It was he wish that the Trust should maintain the castle for the benefit of the local community. Prince Charles is President of the Trust and since his grandmother's death in march 2002, he has stayed at the castle early August each year. For more information on The Castle & Gardens of Mey go to www.castleofmey.org.uk

 

 

 

 

The Rest of Scotland


St. Andrews

St. Andrews, which is known as the "home of golf", is an attractive sea town. Many tourists come here for a round of golf, or to see some of its historical buildings. These historical buildings include its great 15th century university, which is one of the best in Britain. This town also has a 12th century Cathedral and a 13th century Castle. For more information on St. Andrews go to www.standrews.com

 


Loch Ness

Loch Ness is located a few miles up stream from Inverness. This Loch is most famous for its sea monster "Nessie". The first sighting of Nessie was in the 6th Century. There aren't too many sightings today, but that doesn't stop people from all over the world coming to this Loch hoping to get a glance of Nessie. Loch Ness holds more water than all the rivers and lakes in England put together. For more information on Loch Ness go to www.lochness.com

 

 

 

Fort William

Sitting in the shadow of Ben Nevis in this mountainous area, Fort William is a popular destination for those on their holidays. Located near Glen Nevis, Glen Coe, and many other maintain slopes, makes it popular for climbers, skiers, and other adventures.

 

 

Ben Nevis

Ben Nevis, at 4,406 ft. it is Britain's highest mountain. There is a well - worn path to the top starting in Glen Nevis or in town. It is a fair walk, but the scenery is absolutely amazing, and it is here that you will get a true sense of the highlands. Be careful and sensible as every year people are killed on this mountain, although in most cases those people were using different paths.

 

 

Glen Coe

Perhaps Scotland's most famous glen, when in 1692, the Campbell’s murdered the MacDonald’s, which became known as the Massacre of Glen Coe. This was most shameful because of the fact the MacDonald’s had welcomed the Campbell’s into their homes, before they killed them all in their sleep. This is regarded as one of the worst things one clan could do to another. Due to this the Campbell name is not very well liked in Scotland.

Although it has a grim history this glen is beautiful, with its dramatic landscape, narrow valleys and its towering mountains. Glencoe is also the cradle of Scottish mountaineering and this area provides some of the finest climbing and walking trails in the Highlands.

 


 

 



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